Oil platform operations within FS Economy

Offshore operations are usually very fun and challenging and something very specific to helicopters. If you add a great economic simulator such as FS Economy to the party, you are guaranteed several hours of immersive fun. Let's see how we can perform oil platform operations within FS Economy.

How to perform Oil platform operations within FS Economy

Oil platform

FS Economy is a huge and thrilling community that revolves around simulating an economy and a market for virtual pilots. I won't go into much detail as you can find two articles about it here at HeliSimmer (read part 1 and part 2) but, in a nutshell, you can register at their website, download their client (available for FSX, Prepar3D and X-Plane), choose your jobs, rent an aircraft and off you go.

There's a lot more into it but if you read the above articles, you'll be pretty much up to speed.

OK now that we are all set, let's start with some offshore ops, right? That should be easy. We just select a platform to start with and off we go. There's a small problem, though: FS Economy's database does not have oil platforms or anything else that is not an airport or airfield (such as ships and other offshore facilities). Therefore we cannot select them for our flights. Bummer.

So does this means we can't fly our offshore jobs? Nope. You can. You just need to do an extra step. Please note that this method works for other facilities too, such as non-real airports, ships, etc.. Do be careful regarding ships, especially if they move around as the location obviously changes.

Finding which airport your platform relates to

Whenever you land, FS Economy finds the airfield that is closest to your location and, internally, recognizes you as being there. This means that when you land at Gatwick, for example, FS Economy does not recognize the scenery or the exact location. You could land next to the airport and FSE would still recognize you as being in Gatwick.

This works with greater distances too. Which means we can "link" our oil platform, ship, or any other scenery element to an existant FSE airport or airfield.

To do so, you'll just need to land at the location you wish, open the FSE client and try to start a flight (Action -> Start Flight). You will then get a message stating that you have no active aircraft at XYZ. XYZ being the airfield recognized by FSE as being the place you're at. Even when you're not!

In the screenshot below you can see that this oil platform (which is part of the excellent Sahara Desert Fly-in scenery from Aerosoft) is recognized as GQNN, which is Nouakchott in Mauritania.

FS Economy - finding what airport gets recognized

Flying jobs to and from your oil platform

Ok then. Now that we know which airfield we can use to mimic our oil platform, we can now look for jobs to and from it at the FSE website.

A quick airport search for GQNN gives us a list of jobs from GQNN to several other airports in the surroundings. GOSS (St Louis, Senegal) is not too far away and has a couple of jobs to GQNN, which can give us some extra virtual cash if we do a round to and from the platform.

FS Economy jobs from GQNN

Clicking on the ICAO takes us to the GOSS page and we can see that there are actually 3 jobs to GQNN, which means we can actually do them, flying to our platform. If we have an helicopter capable of transporting 5 passengers, this means we can do a full run (GOSS -> GQNN -> GOSS) and make a bit over v$6,000 (minus expenses). Not bad for a 2 hour helicopter flight!

FS Economy jobs to GQNN

And there you go. We're all set for some cool Sahara Desert offshore operations.

Out of curiosity, there's a ship and a lighthouse very near the oil platform that we used as the example, which are also recognized as GQNN so, if we ever want to change things a bit, we can always use them as alternative locations for jobs.

Sahara Desert ship Sahara Desert lighthouse

I hope you find this article useful for starting your own FS Economy offshore operations. Got some corrections, ideas or questions? Please use the comments section below.

Sérgio Costa

About Sérgio Costa

Sérgio has been a flight simulation enthusiast for nearly 25 years. His passion with helicopters developed during MSFS 2000 when he discovered the complexity of these aircraft and the challenge it was to control them. Since then he has been primarily a helicopter flight simmer, trying his best not to crash and kill all his virtual passengers. Sérgio is HeliSimmer's editor and writer and one of the Three Grumpy Simmers, a YouTube series and Podcast produced together with YouTubers Bel Geode and NovaWing24, obviously dedicated to flight simulation.

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